Hello! I am a computational biophysicist currently working on Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis at the University of Leeds, UK. You can get in touch with me at [email protected]. While you're here, please take a look at my CV and LinkedIn profile!



Physics, Software

Coarse-grained Simulations of Myosin-VII Inhibition using FFEA

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Myosin-VII is part of the Myosin family of motor proteins. It has a key role in the operation of biological structures in the eye and inner ear. Unfortunately, the dynamics of Myosin-VII and its inhibition are poorly-understood. This article details my use of FFEA (Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis), a coarse-grained continuum simulation package, to model the motion of Myosin-VII, and understand its inhibition behaviour.

Posted February 16, 2016

Engineering, Physics

The Physics and Thermal Characterisation of Sharp LEDs

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As you probably know, halogen light bulbs are incandescent: they produce light as a side effect of being heated up. Conversely, LEDs are semiconductor devices, and prolonged heat can be very damaging to them. LED devices tend to be cooled in a similar way to computer CPUs – using a thermal interface (like thermal paste) a heatsink, and sometimes a fan as well. However, the effectiveness of these cooling methods can vary wildly, depending on the operational limits of the LED and the type of thermal interface being used. In this article, I’ll discuss the experimental methods I designed to characterise the thermal performance of LEDs using a variety of cooling methods.

Posted September 3, 2015

Engineering, Software

The Sharp Colour Science Tool

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One of my responsibilities at Sharp was testing and analysing the type and quality of light produced by LED devices using an integrating sphere. I developed a graphical tool in Python that would automatically interpret spectral power distributions, read metadata from files, compute a large variety of colour metrics, and automatically generate PDF reports.

Posted September 3, 2015

Games

Lawyer Guy: Sweet Dreams

Sweet Dreams is the second demo area for Lawyer Guy: Defender of Justice, an action-platformer set to be released sometime. This article contains a detailed analysis of a number of game design topics relevant to this level, such as enemy design, tutorialisation, emergent gameplay, and one very infamous bug.

Posted July 13, 2015

Writing

Memories for Sale

A short story I wrote in 2015 that can be loosely classified as speculative fiction. The story is about a man who sells his memories for money. You can also find this story on Reddit’s ‘nosleep’ forum.

Posted June 18, 2015

Engineering

Information Engineering

 

I gave this presentation at the STFC in Harwell and at ARUP in London as part of the Engineering Development Trust’s ‘Future Industry Leaders Award’ competition. Although I didn’t win, I was offered a job as a result, which makes me feel better about not winning. This presentation focuses on how to design user experiences (UX) for highly technical websites, and why it’s important to do so.

Posted May 18, 2015

Games

Lawyer Guy: The North Side

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The North Side is the first test area for Lawyer Guy: Defender of Justice, an action-platformer set to be released sometime. I started developing Lawyer Guy in around 2008 as a joke, abandoned it for around 6 years, then started working on it again in late 2014. This article is about the design and implementation of The North Side – being the first playable area, it took quite a lot of work.

Posted February 8, 2015

Physics

Calculation of the Bohr Magneton Using the Zeeman Effect

zeemanrings

The Bohr Magneton is a physical constant which is used to express the dipole moment of electrons. It corresponds to the angular momentum of an electron in the lowest orbital. The Bohr Magneton relates the splitting of atomic energy levels to the strength of an applied magnetic field. The Zeeman effect offers us an easy way to observe this splitting. In this lab report, I discuss a how to observe the Zeeman effect, and how it can be used to compute an accurate value for the Bohr Magneton.

Posted May 21, 2014

Physics, Software

Visualising Quantum Random Walks in Python

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A random walk (sometimes called ‘the drunkard’s walk’ describes the motion of a particle that undergoes a series of random steps. But what happens if that particle is a quantum particle? This article presents a few interesting ways of visualising this motion, using Python and matplotlib.

Posted March 16, 2014